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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/16/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    It seems the website is down and I'm unable to find a mirror for the W10 download exe. Is this available anywhere?
  2. 1 point
    self reply: issue solved - Upgraded the Flirc SE firmware to the latest available for gen1: v39 - Re-recorded the Wake key (Harmony is programmed to send "FLIRC > AspectRatio" as the power-on command. made sure that "sleep_detect" is activated. It just worked; turning off other Activities like Netflix will no longer cause the HTPC/Flirc to wake up. Before, I had v37 and it seems sleep_detect wasn't working.
  3. 1 point
    For anyone else looking for the answer to the sleep wake on usb question the answer is here
  4. 1 point
    @orion just edit the /etc/apt/sources.list and replace debian with ubuntu and buster with with xenial in the Flirc repo address. Then run apt-get update and apt-get install flirc again.
  5. 1 point
    Hello all. I had a peculiar issue where my Flirc was receiving a continuous button press. It was like somebody was holding down the up button on my remote. I believe the culprit was my phone's proximity sensor, which is IR based technology. I started testing things in the usual way. I cleared my configuration, switched ports, reinstalled, made sure my firmware was upgraded.. but nothing was working. The only thing that could stop the button input was when I covered the device with my hand. I then thought that maybe I had a faulty remote with a button stuck down, so I removed all of the batteries from my remotes and Flirc was still receiving a signal. I was absolutely puzzled. A couple hours later I picked up my phone, walked away, and the button pressing stopped! I set my phone back on top of my computer and the button presses started up again. I finally figured it out! =D When my phone is within 6 inches of the Flirc it registers a button press. My Flirc is plugged into the USB ports on the top of my case and my phone was resting directly next to it. My phone is a Pixel 2 so I hopped online, did some research and found that the proximity sensor in the phone is IR based. The good news is that the IR interference only happens when my phone is inches away from the device. Keep in mind that your mileage may vary though. I just wanted to share this in case someone else is searching the forums for a related issue.
  6. 1 point
    Flirc SE is a gen1 device.
  7. 1 point
    Which Flirc model do you have? If it's 2nd gen one, then you can create macros using a command line tool (not yet supported in the GUI). But there's already a wake/suspend function you can use. It's in the GUI in Media keys controller.
  8. 1 point
    Exactly as @FrogFan2 explained. To be more specific, you have two options: cd "C:\Program Files (x86)\Flirc\" flirc_util.exe record power or straight away: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Flirc\flirc_util.exe" record power There's also an option to add "C:\Program Files (x86)\Flirc\" to the PATH environment variable, which would allow you to execute flirc_util.exe from any location. To add Flirc to your PATH follow this page: https://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000549.htm (just one of the first results when searching "windows add to path" in Google).
  9. 1 point
    I'll jump in here and stand corrected by one of the experts if necessary. You're in the wrong directory when you issue the Flirc commands when using flirc_util.exe. Make sure you run flirc_util from the directory in which is resides. In your case, it looks like that is C\Program Files (x86)\Flirc. Thus, if you want to run a "keys" command, then type, without the quotes, "flirc_util.exe keys" from the prompt C\Program Files (x86)\Flirc. You're trying to run the command from C:\Users\Clive. That's not where flirc_util.exe resides. I'm a noob myself. I just figured out how to run this utility.
  10. 1 point
    Just change it manually to: deb https://packagecloud.io/Flirc/repo/ubuntu/ zesty main The packages should all be the same anyway.
  11. 1 point
    Hi, Any software you want to control with Flirc needs to support keyboard controls. So first of all you need to make sure the MediaMonkey can be fully (or at least at satisfactory level) controlled with just a normal (or multimedia) keyboard. As MediaMonkey is not directly supported in Flirc (no predefined controller in the Flirc GUI) you need to know the key shortcuts/key combinations for all functions in the software that you're interested in. On the Harmony side, you can use one of the Flirc profiles, but you need to remember, that they are predefined for specific usages (Kodi, Media Center etc). This means that not all buttons on the remote are even mapped to some function and because of that they are disabled. You can still use them if you really want but you can also choose some 3rd party hardware profile, for example for some Samsung or LG TV (these usually work well with Flirc). Just remember to choose something you don't actually own (if you have Samsung TV, then don't use Samsung TV profile to use with Flirc). On the Flirc side, start the Flirc GUI application. If you want to stick with Flirc profile on Harmony you probably should disable built-in profiles (as MediaMonkey is not supported by these anyway). In the GUI, go to Advanced settings (in menu) and uncheck all built-in profiles. If you choose something else than Flirc profile in Harmony, then you can skip the previous step. Then in Controllers menu, select Full Keyboard or Media Keys (you'll probably need both). Then select a key or key combination which controls some function in the MediaMonkey - you should be asked by the application to press some button on the remote. Press the button you want to assign to the function you've selected. And continue that way until you map everything you need. If some buttons on the Harmony don't record then that means that the button is not used in the Harmony profile you've selected and is disabled (doesn't send any signal).
  12. 1 point
    I've made a tutorial how to do this quite a long time ago: It should still work, but I've stopped using Windows so I can't confirm it. I don't know if Generic HID plugin has seen any changes since 2014, so you can first try the one provided in the default install and if it doesn't work properly (no key hold detection) you can try mine, which I've linked in the thread. But keep in mind that this is a modification of Generic HID plugin from 2014 version of EventGhost so I don't know if it's still compatible or not.
  13. 1 point
    Everything is on thingiverse. https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2767826
  14. 1 point
    Looks awesome. Do you have pictures of finished version? I think I'll use your idea for my own hat (an RF controller for my home automation).
  15. 1 point
    Yes, that's the idea. I see that this model supports 4 devices. Just select one that is not being used for anything right now and enter some setup code. For example on my OneForAll Simple 4 (URC 6440) I'm using a TV setup code 2051, which is for a Samsung TV (I don't have a Samsung TV) and it works really good with Flirc. To use a TV setup code on non-TV device on OFA remote, you first need to remap that device. It's easy to do: http://www.hifi-remote.com/wiki/index.php?title=Manual_Programming_-_9xx_Commands#.28992.29_Mode_Map_-_Re-define_a_Device_Button (this page contains codes that may not work on your remote or work in a different way than described, you should be careful if you want to try some of them - but if they're used correctly, they can be really helpful) As you can see, the 992 code can be used to remap device button. From what I can see, your remote doesn't have physical device buttons, but just a MODE button which switches selected device (indicated by LED at the top). Also the Magic button on your remote is the same as SETUP in the instruction. When the linked instruction says: "TAP the "from" DEVICE, (ie, the one you are copying from)", you need to use MODE button to select the device and press magic. So for example, if you want to use TV code on SAT device: 1. Hold Magic until you see 2 blinks 2. Enter code 992 using digit keys - if code is accepted you should get another 2 blinks 3. Using MODE button, select TV, press Magic 4. Using MODE button, select SAT, press Magic - the remote should confirm with 2 blinks After that you can try programming 2051 on the SAT key. Hold the Magic until you get 2 blinks, select SAT and enter 2051. You should get another 2 blinks as confirmation. If you get a single long blink, that means the remote didn't accept the command.
  16. 1 point
    OneForAll remotes are universal remotes. You should have a user manual with yours, which explain how to program multiple different devices on it. Just select a different device button on your remote, program it to some different device than your TV and use that device to program your Flirc. If you want more information then you need to provide more info yourself. At least what is the exact model of the remote?
  17. 1 point
    Download the latest GUI on the website, you should be prompted that there is an update. Macs are the only reliable machines at notifying of an available update. Let me know if that helps.
  18. 1 point
    Are you trying to use your original TV remote you're using to also control your TV, to also control your HTPC? Does this remote has any universal remote control capability? If not then both your TV and HTPC (through Flirc) will see the same signal and react to it - both devices may execute some actions upon pressing some buttons.
  19. 1 point
    Can you elaborate what this means: "It seems to be getting confused and not registering any keys properly... Other remotes that aren't connected to my TV work fine." Make sure you're on the latest firmware. We're on v4.4.2, and that has some fixes for sony remotes.
  20. 1 point
    I have a similar issue, my old flirc is on Firmware: v255.7.0 [0x020A07FF]. The GUI just says it's too new and won't update it. On ubuntu, the flirc_util is still bundled with the GUI. So what I did was: sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/flirc_util then you can run things like /usr/bin/flirc_util version That should tell you if it's working. Now to update it here is what I just had to do (what a pain in the balls). on Ubuntu: sudo apt-get remove flirc wget http://apt.flirc.tv/arch/x86_64/backup/flirc_1.2.6-1ubuntu1_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i flirc_1.2.6-1ubuntu1_amd64.deb Flirc Then it updated the firmware to 2.6.0. Half way there! sudo apt-get remove flirc (gets rid of 1.2.6 version) sudo apt-get install flirc (re-installs 3.1.0) Flirc (now it prompts you to upgrade the firmware) I don't really enjoy having to scrape through archive.org to find the old repository to get an older version, kind of lame.
  21. 1 point
    Hello all, I just recently purchased a Flirc, a device I have had my eye on for a very long time, and so far I am very happy with it. It is currently connected to my Windows 10 HTPC running Plex. I wanted to share a small AHK script which will do three things to prevent me from having to grab the PC keyboard when plex is closed/minimized, the volume is muted, or I want to minimize plex when using Netflix (TV App). Launch plex if it is not already running, maximize it, then full screen it if needed (Record button on remote > CTRL+SHIFT+F1) Note: You may need to update the plex directory if yours is not "C:\Program Files\Plex\Plex Media Player\PlexMediaPlayer.exe" Unmute and set the volume 100% (Volume Up on remote > CTRL+SHIFT+F2) Minimize Plex to prevent the button pushes in Netflix from doing things in Plex (Netflix button on remote > CTRL+SHIFT+F3) I hope this helps and let me know if you have any questions! Cheers, Ned FlircAssistant.ahk
  22. 1 point
    Hi, Flirc basically works like a keyboard. You teach it by selecting a keyboard key or key combination (with modifiers) and assign it to a button on a remote, by pressing the button. It should work with most remotes but some may cause problems. Flirc is "tuned" to remotes which use 38 kHz carrier frequency. This frequency is used by most consumer appliances' remotes. It won't work properly with remotes which use frequencies too far from that, like some MCE remotes working at 50-something kHz for example. Also there are many different IR protocols. Some work better than others and some may be unusable. For example many settop boxes (like cable boxes) use strange proprietary protocols that don't work well with Flirc. I think the best solution is to look for a universal remote that lay good in your hand. You can then switch device profiles and test which works best for you. My personal preference is to use a device profile which uses one of the NEC family protocols (preferably NECx1 or NECx2). For example LG uses NEC protocols (NEC1 for TVs, NECx1 for soundbars/sound systems). Also Samsung uses NEC for some TVs. I don't know what Panasonic uses but @jason also recommends that brand. I don't recommend Philips or MCE as these are RC5/RC6 based. These protocols have toggle bit that changes on each key press. This means you'd need to record each remote button twice. I'm using AllForOne Simple 4 remote (URC-6440). It's really nice universal remote and the price is really good. It's 4-device by default, but there's a possibility to upgrade it to 12-device one using custom firmware (really easy to install and fully reversible). The custom firmware also adds a lot of features. There's also a community developed PC software (for Windows, Mac and Linux!) that allows you to configure the remote whatever you want (the remote has microUSB port to connect to PC). If you can learn something about this and other remotes from the same manufacturer, you can go to http://hifi-remote.com/forums/. It's a community forum focused on providing support and extra features for this remotes. You can also go the Logitech Harmony way. There're even ready to use Flirc profiles in the Harmony software which are supported by Flirc without any programming. They do not give you 100% of functionality out of a box. Rather something like a quick start. I don't have Harmony so I can't tell you much about them.
  23. 1 point
    In case anybody is interested, I have figured out how to turn off the Shield TV with Harmony 650+Flirc (or more precisely, put the Shield TV to sleep.) Yes, I'm THAT OCD about keeping my power bill down (not to mention keeping my house cooler in Phoenix summers.) What you'll want to do is tell your Harmony that in fact you do want to control the power of your Shield TV, and then set the Flirc to recognize your profile's power off button. Different profiles have different defaults in this regard, and I know people use different ones, so I'm just going to tell you how I configured mine: 1. I used DanVM's instructions (found here), only I used Flirc XBMC profile (when I chose it, MyHarmony called it Flirc Kodi) as my beginning template and renamed it to Shield TV. 2. In the MyHarmony application, Under Devices > Change Device Settings > Power Settings > Next > I want to turn off this device when not in use. > I press the same button for on and for off > Next > +Add Command > Under the dropdown menu, select PowerOff > Leave everything else default and click Finish 3. Open the Flirc application > Controllers > Media Keys > click the power icon button. 4. On your Harmony remote's LCD screen buttons, go to Devices > Shield TV (or whatever you named it) > Power Off. (If your flirc application says 'Recorded Successfully', then it worked, even if it suspended your PC.) Done! Connect your Flirc to your Shield TV and your harmony remote should turn it off as expected. Ideally, somebody could pester logitech (I don't know how to contact them) to add a Flirc + Shield TV profile that effectively does everything I mentioned above. Here are some things that I wish we could have but probably can't ever have: - Universal 8 second back / 30 second forward buttons that don't bring up the playbar overlay - Universal subtitle toggle button (for those moments when you're not quite sure what the person is saying) - A way to use voice search without having to reach for the Shield TV stick remote (By universal, I mean works on every app) One can only dream, I suppose. Nonetheless, this works really well, and I have to say that the Shield TV is the best STB I've ever owned (you really can have it all with this thing; netflix, amazon, youtube, plex, kodi, hbo, Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD, emulators, all on a very speedy UI) and Flirc makes it even better.
  24. 1 point
    The basics of how it all works, just in case: Start with the Harmony config since this seems to be tripping you up. You only need to pick one device for your Shield profile, and (ironically enough) you don't want to pick "Shield TV" WITH the Harmony since that profile is for models that have IR (or WiFi/BT if you have the Harmony hub) and you don't want that since you are using a FLIRC. Just pick something that has a lot of buttons available (for flexibility) and won't interfere with any other devices you have. A lot of us here us the ViewTV AT-163 profile. Pick it and name it whatever you want, like "Shield TV" :) Now your Harmony is programmed to send IR signals for all (or at least most) of it's buttons. *It doesn't matter what those signals are* as long as they are each unique and don't accidentally trigger other equipment (which is why the AT-163 is a good choice....unless of course you have one :) ). All that matters is that when you press a button, a unique IR command is blasted out. The FLIRC will do the rest. Now, the FLIRC. The FLIRC dongle takes those discreet IR signals and translates them to commands the Shield TV understands. When you program the FLIRC via its application and assign IR commands to buttons you want to make sure you use the Shield layout first, for the basics, because Jason updated the software with the correct commands the Shield needs. Specifically, the "ok" button now functions correctly cross-app. So choose that profile and manually (don't click "Go" and have it do it automatically, that will map some commands you want for Kodi later twice) click each button, then press the corresponding button on your Harmony remote to map it. Basically, the 4 directions, the "ok" button, the back button, and the home button. Pick the buttons on your Harmony you want to do those functions (should be obvious) and have at it. Once you've done that, bring up the Kodi layout. Now you can program buttons for things like Play, Pause, ff/rw, etc. If you want even more control, skip the Kodi layout and use the full keyboard layout instead. Pull up (or print) this page for reference: http://kodi.wiki/view/Keyboard_controls . That's a complete list of keyboard shortcuts for Kodi. You can assign buttons to whatever keys on the keyboard you want. Don't forget that with most Harmony's you can also create custom buttons if you want to map advanced stuff, like for subtitles. Again, it doesn't matter what IR commands are assigned to the Harmony for each button, as long as it is discreet! The FLIRC is going to take whatever IR signal you sent it and translate that to the correct keyboard command. Doing this will give you: Basic Shield remote functionality across all applications (except voice control, since there's no mic on the Harmony.) Advanced keymap control for apps that support full keyboard commands - like Kodi. Get it?
  25. 1 point
    This is probably unsupported in any way by Jason so please don't report bugs in other threads when using this solution. If you have any problems with this setup it is better to post them here and I'll try to help if I have time to do so. Hi, This how-to is for users who want to build more advanced control schemes using their Flirc devices. It is mainly directed to Windows users because there is no way in Windows to capture input from a single keyboard, but can be done in Linux. But it should be also applicable in other OS-es when used with correct software. The problem is that not everything can be done just by defining a single key combinations. There are applications like AutoHotKey (AHK) or EventGhost (EG) that can capture specific key combinations but there is a problem. Having many buttons on the mapped remote it is sometimes hard to find key combinations that are not used as OS or other apps shortcuts already. By capturing the specific key combination in AHK or EG user basically blocks this combination even on a normal keyboard connected to the PC (as there is no way in Windows to capture only input from one specific keyboard). Here comes HID standard for the rescue. HID keyboards are just one of the many usages of this standard. Because of that the HID standard has been split into multiple usage tables. Standard keys on keyboards use table 7 and in Windows codes from this table are immediately captured by HID keyboard filter driver and are converted into key presses. On the other hand keys like multimedia keys are defined in usage table 12. Codes from this table are not captured by the Windows. Only a few of them are natively supported (like volume, mute, play, pause etc). Flirc GUI and CLI util provide the ability to map only a few of the keys from table 12. Those keys when mapped are not recognized by AHK or EG when used with keyboard input plugins. This gave me an idea to do some experiments. I needed to find out how these multimedia keys are stored in the Flirc which can be checked by inspecting saved config file. After that I checked if I can assign any HID code from the table 12 and I was successful. I've found out that there is a key code which acts as a marker for Flirc to send usage 12 instead o 7. When this marker is found then the actual HID key ID is stored as a modifier. It is possible to use flirc_util to map almost any code from table 12: flirc_util.exe record_api 176 102 where 176 is decimal value of key ID (Play key in this case) and 102 is a marker that tells Flirc that this is key from table 12. Table 12 has more than 256 keys defined but unfortunately Flirc can only hold a single byte value so there is still a restriction in the number of keys. There are also holes in the list of keys in this table which I've used in my own config so I don't have any conflicts with other hardware and software. These are the usable values: 4-31, 34-47, 55-63, 73-95, 103-127, 159, 165-175. There are probably more but I've stopped looking other codes that are not mentioned by the standard. I think that other keys that are in the standard are also usable. Most of them are not natively supported by the Windows but I used these ranges in my case to be on the safe side. The way to record these keys is to change the first value to one in these ranges and record a button to them incrementally. In my setup I've used EventGhost to capture HID events and map them to things I want them to do. It provides some nice features like programmable on screen menus and many plugins for specific apps like XBMC (it uses XBMC RPC API). To capture events from HID device a Generic HID plugin must be used. Unfortunately there is a small problem with this plugin and it sometimes sends multiple HID events on single button press (this is not the same problem as with repeated keys). I have a modifier Generic HID plugin that works very well with Flirc in this mode of operation. I can share it if there is a demand for it. I can also extend the how-to to some basic EG configuration. I haven't used AHK but I know that there is also a way to capture HID events in it and use them to control things. All the numbers I'm referring to are taken from this document http://www.freebsddiary.org/APC/usb_hid_usages.php
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