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pope5

Using Flirc for a totally different purpose

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Hello,

 

there are some tablets on the market, that are equipped with an infrared blaster to work as an universal remote control. Then there are some apps, which allow to specify, which keys are to be shown on the tablet and which signals should be sent by the infrared interface, when the key is pressed. Unfortunately, not all remote controls are defined for those apps.

 

My idea is, that Flirc can record, which signal is sent by the original remote control and can report it in a file or simply to the screen. Even the flirc configuration file (probably) has this information stored in it.

 

Is there a way, to extract the information from that file, which key sends which infrared signal?

 

That would be great, because then, any unkown remote  control could be used for those apps which allow an individual configuration.

 

Here are the links to 2 apps, which can be found in the google play store.

 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.harrygr.rcoid   (RCoid - IR Fernbedienung)

 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.freeirtv   (IR Universal Remote)

 

Thank you for your help.

 

pope5

 

 

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No way to extract it, think of it as a compressed representation of the signal that can't be uncompressed.

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When I pair some keys with Flirc, the config file is very small. E.g. 0x29 bytes and begins with

the following hex string:

 

0029 B300 05F0 5152 E500...

 

when I pair more keys, the config gets longer e.g. 0x8F bytes but the first bytes are

identical. So, the new keys seem to be appended.

 

Shall I append onyl one key after the other, to learn, what is stored in the config?

 

What I want to know is, how is the code stored, that I could extract the IR signal

for the IR app on my tablet. Is there no documentation - or isn't there the source code

available, where I can extract this info?

 

There would be a new market for the flirc for all those users with an tablet or

smartphone with IR buster. Of course, then we customers would need an app which

shows the ir code received, that we can transfer it to the IR app.

 

 

Thank you for your reply.

 

pope5

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When I pair some keys with Flirc, the config file is very small. E.g. 0x29 bytes and begins with

the following hex string:

 

0029 B300 05F0 5152 E500...

 

when I pair more keys, the config gets longer e.g. 0x8F bytes but the first bytes are

identical. So, the new keys seem to be appended.

 

Shall I append onyl one key after the other, to learn, what is stored in the config?

 

What I want to know is, how is the code stored, that I could extract the IR signal

for the IR app on my tablet. Is there no documentation - or isn't there the source code

available, where I can extract this info?

 

There would be a new market for the flirc for all those users with an tablet or

smartphone with IR buster. Of course, then we customers would need an app which

shows the ir code received, that we can transfer it to the IR app.

 

 

Thank you for your reply.

 

pope5

So the code at the end is the representation of the infrared signal, but this can't be understood by any tv, android app, or anything in the world for that matter. I use a custom algorithm to extract the long pattern sent from a remote, and compress it into a 32 bit representation that can never be converted back into the original format.

 

I do plan on doing something else in the future to help with this, but I can't do it with the current model.

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Can't you output the code you receive before you compress it. Always only one key.

(thats a new function in the GUI).

 

Of course, this value must be converted into the code stored by IR apps. But perhaps

there is a rule, how the code received by the original remote control must be

converted. And I do not see, that for this solution, there must be another model.

Already this model receives an IR code and should simply display it.

 

 

regards

 

pope5

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Jason,

 

may I ask again, if you can provide an option or even a simple program, which shows the code, the usb stick receives when a remote control key is pressed? This code is the uncompressed code and perhaps, can be converted into the code needed by ir remote control apps.

 

The definition for an app on my Samsung Galaxy S4 for the key to increase the loudness on my Samsung LCD TV reads: 38000,168,169,21,64,21,64,21,64,21,22,21,22.... (it is a very long string)

 

Thank you for your reply.

 

Pope5

Edited by pope5

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Those apps which allow an individual configuration of the remote control, need a string to be entered, which represents the ir signal. So I think, this would be a similar value, as flirc receives.

 

As I mentioned in my last reply, I see for a button in the app a value like

 

38000,168,169,3x(21,64),5x(21,22),3x(21,64),5x(21,22),3x(21,64),3x(21,22),5x(21,64),21,1

 

This value apparently is used, to send the ir beam like the original remote control.

 

Are the values, you receive by flirc similar? Or do you see a similarity between these values ant that, what you receive into such a string?

 

If we would recognize a similarity, flirc could be used for all thise apps to get the appropriate value. And you could generate your own

remote control, even if the codes are not known. And that is it, what i meant, when I wrote ...this would be a totally new usage of flirc.

 

regards

 

pope5

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It seems like a really complicated way of achieving something flirc already does very simply.

 

What app are you using?

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I want to use the app RCOID -  URL https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.harrygr.rcoid

 

There are many remote control apps, that allow an individual definition of the buttons - and consequently the code for the ir beam.

 

Some of them point to a database (e.g. http://lirc.sourceforge.net/remotes), where the codes are stored. But thoug there are 60000 remote controls listed, I have two, which are not.

 

As I have been told by the author of RCOID the format of the codes stored for each key comes from Samsung. Formerly, this code was used by the smartphone to send the ir beam. Since Android 4.4 it is minimal different. The above code I mentioned in my former mail indicates:

38000 is the frequency in Hz. Then the signal beginns. 168 impulses are sent. Then there is pause acording to 169 impulses. Then 21 impulses are sent and then there is a pause of 64 pulses. etc.

 

In my opinion, the flirc stick must see these impulses and the program should write these values to the screen. Of course, this is quite a lot of work (if you can't copy and paste), to enter these values (or converted values) into the app. But when the values your program shows are clear, I am shure, the author of RCOID will find a way, to take over the values into the apropriate key within his app.

I also can imagine, that I attach the flirc stick with an apropriate cable to my tablet and there will be an app, which displays the code for a key of the remote control. Then one could copy the value and past it into RCOID.

 

 

Thank you for your help.

 

pope5

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I want to use the app RCOID -  URL https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.harrygr.rcoid

 

There are many remote control apps, that allow an individual definition of the buttons - and consequently the code for the ir beam.

 

Some of them point to a database (e.g. http://lirc.sourceforge.net/remotes), where the codes are stored. But thoug there are 60000 remote controls listed, I have two, which are not.

 

As I have been told by the author of RCOID the format of the codes stored for each key comes from Samsung. Formerly, this code was used by the smartphone to send the ir beam. Since Android 4.4 it is minimal different. The above code I mentioned in my former mail indicates:

38000 is the frequency in Hz. Then the signal beginns. 168 impulses are sent. Then there is pause acording to 169 impulses. Then 21 impulses are sent and then there is a pause of 64 pulses. etc.

 

In my opinion, the flirc stick must see these impulses and the program should write these values to the screen. Of course, this is quite a lot of work (if you can't copy and paste), to enter these values (or converted values) into the app. But when the values your program shows are clear, I am shure, the author of RCOID will find a way, to take over the values into the apropriate key within his app.

I also can imagine, that I attach the flirc stick with an apropriate cable to my tablet and there will be an app, which displays the code for a key of the remote control. Then one could copy the value and past it into RCOID.

 

 

Thank you for your help.

 

pope5

I don't have support for that. It's not quite do-able with my current model and implementation. I'm very sorry. I plan on addressing this, but I don't have a timeline.

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Jason,

 

didn't I read anywere, that the source codefor flirc is open source?

Or can you send me the source code, that I can try to find a way, to get a solution for my own?

 

And please tell me, if I am right, that your flirc stick is able to receive the ir signals as I think. Or is there something I do not see correctly?

 

I hope, that I do not nerve you with all my questions.

 

 

Thank you agin for your patience and your help.

 

pope5

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Jason and Chris

 

 

please .....  help

 

 

Thank you

 

pope5

 

pope5, I'm really sorry, Chris is just an amazing friend who jumps in to help. I do this solo. Flirc firmware is not open source, and that's the only place this will help.

 

I can't address this request, I do this on the side of a full time job (which is very busy), got a young baby, and I've got a bunch of products I'm working on to be released this year.

I also can't do this in the existing hardware version. It's too limited, I'm very sorry. If it doesn't meet your needs, I'm happy to give you a refund.

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What do want to use it for?

If i'm using a Android device, there are many remote solutions via wifi, so flirc should be obsolete.

The only difference is maybe more customization...

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What do want to use it for?

If i'm using a Android device, there are many remote solutions via wifi, so flirc should be obsolete.

The only difference is maybe more customization...

touch screen's will never replace remotes. It's not practical. WIFI will eventually break into consumer remote control's, but it's still too expensive.

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@nobuddy0816

 

There are some Android devices with infrared boosters and there are diffent apps, which allow to build your individual remote control. However, you need to know the ir code to be sent. And that cannot be determined by the andriod devices. So I was looking for a way to determine this and believed, that flirc could be extented, to do this.

 

In the meantime I found a small module, which can record the ir beams. Look here:

 

http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/USB_Infrared_Toy

 

Perhaps this is an idea for Jason. His stick is much more handy!

 

pope5

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I got that, but was still wondering, for what purpose do you want to use it exacty.

I'm using XBMC and have the choice to use flirc (what i actually do) with a remote or can use an android app of my choice to control XBMC over WIFI (e.g. Yatse).

Also there are many apps, provided by manufacturers like e.g. Samsung, to control TV and/or HiFi components, which connected via WiFi/ Ethernet to the internet/home network.

So beside the customization capabilities, where's the advantage to read out and program ir codes to an app, when already hundreds of apps are available and ready to go?

 

@ Jason: Sure, the haptic feelings of a real remote are none to a slicky touchscreen. Apps are always a supplement to a remote due to it's limitations depending on its purpose (like controlling XBMC).

Edited by Nobuddy0816

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@ Nobuddy0816

 

not all media hardware can be controlled via the network. Either it is not up to date (I have an LCD which is 4 year old which has no tcp connector) or doesn't have a network connection at all. However they still do have only an IR receiver. And that is the reason why android tablets with ir booster and the necessary apps are very usefull.

 

Especially, when you have an app, which allows different remote controls to be represented on a single page (like RCoid - see google playstore). Then you have only one app and can control all important functions of your LCD, sat receiver, av receiver, bd player and media player.

 

The drawback is, that you need the ir code to build such an remote control. And I believed, FLIRC is able to receive ir beams from different remote controls and thus could alternatively show a hex code, like shown in LIRC databases (which in turn are needed by the ir apps) E.g. in this database: http://winlirc.sourceforge.net/remotes/

 

And, if this would be possible, finally I can imagine that you could even connect the Flirc stick to your tablet and enter the code directly into the ir app.

 

pope5

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